Work by Cool Star Lab Alumna Aishwarya Iyer Featured in NASA Press Release

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Cool Star Lab alumna Aishwarya Iyer, currently a Master’s student at CSU Northridge and intern at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has recently published work on exoplanet atmospheres that has been featured in a NASA Press Release. Her paper, “A Characteristic Transmission Spectrum Dominated by H2O Applies to the Majority of HST/WFC3 Exoplanet Observations“, published in the Astrophysical Journal, concludes that most hot Jupiter atmospheres likely contain water vapor, even those that show weak water features. This is due to the role of hazes and clouds, which can obscure molecular gas features. Aisha and her team performed a comprehensive analysis of 19 Hot Jupiter transmission spectra taken by HST/WFC3, and modeling analysis indicates that the bulk of water vapor lies below the cloud layers. This work is a major advance in understanding the role of clouds and haze in exoplanetary atmospheres, which are also important constituents in brown dwarf atmospheres.

The paper can be accessed at http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ…823..109I and the press release can be found at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6527

Cool Star Lab Contributes to the Discovery of 3 Potentially Habitable Earth-Sized Worlds

 

Adam Burgasser and Daniella Bardalez Gagliuffi were part of an international team headed by Michael Gillon at the University of Liege that discovered three Earth-sized planets orbiting around the habitable zone of a nearby ultracool dwarf, TRAPPIST-1. The results were reported in the May 2, 2016 issue of Nature.

This artist’s impression shows an imagined view of the three planets orbiting an ultracool dwarf star just 40 light-years from Earth that were discovered using the TRAPPIST telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory. These worlds have sizes and temperatures similar to those of Venus and Earth and may be the best targets found so far for the search for life outside the Solar System. They are the first planets ever discovered around such a tiny and dim star. In this view one of the inner planets is seen in transit across the disc of its tiny and dim parent star.

This artist’s impression shows an imagined view of the three planets orbiting an ultracool dwarf star just 40 light-years from Earth that were discovered using the TRAPPIST telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory. These worlds have sizes and temperatures similar to those of Venus and Earth and may be the best targets found so far for the search for life outside the Solar System. They are the first planets ever discovered around such a tiny and dim star. In this view one of the inner planets is seen in transit across the disc of its tiny and dim parent star (ESO/M. Kornmesser, CC BY)

Below is a reproduction of a The Conversation article I wrote for this discovery, with images from the official ESO press release.

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